10-SPEED TRICKLE | SRAM X7 Rear Derailleur Goes Type 2, 10-Speed Shifters Updated

SRAM X7 Type 2 Rear Derailleur

X7 Type 2 Rear Derailleur

Trickle-down technology continues to make high-tech more affordable, and SRAM‘s 10-speed drivetrain offerings are no exception. SRAM‘s cheekily named Type 2 (the silent killer) clutch-type rear mech has been introduced at the X7 level, meaning a 293-gram 10-speed rear-derailleur sans chain slap with an $89 MSRP. The X7 Type 2 has a 36-tooth maximum capacity and is offered in short, medium and long-cage options.

SRAM CAGE LOCK

 

CAGE LOCK is also par for the course in Type 2 territory, meaning you can lock the cage in place—i.e., extended—with the push of a button to make trailside maintenance less of a headache. Things are much easier when you have both hands free to fumble with tire levers.

 

10-Speed Shifters

SRAM_MTB_X0_Shifter_RT_10SP_Red_md

SRAM also let on that the majority of its 10-speed shifters—X0, X9 and X7—will now be outfitted with the same internals as the top-of-the-line XX shifters.

The new X0 shifter will retail for $262 and gets all the goods: ball-bearing pull lever, adjustable pull lever and three different colors to choose from—the latter being the most important.

All three versions go on a diet, allowing for an easier fit among the ever-increasingly crowded handlebar real-estate with proliferation of bar-mounted remotes for suspension, dropper posts, etc. The box for Zero Loss Shifting—read instant—will also be checked off on all updated shifters.

x9

The new X9 shifters will retail for $123 and feature a ball-bearing pull lever.

SRAM X7 10-Speed Shifter

The affordable workhorse of the line, the X7, gets a price tag of $70 and a quick cable change port.

by Don Stefanovich

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VIDEO | Nicolas Vouilloz Tests SRAM Enduro Wheels in Peillon

Nico Vouilloz counts 10 World Champion titles and five World Cup wins to his credit, making him one of the most decorated downhill mountain bikers in the world. He’s also a rally car champion, but now Nico has his sights on the inaugural Enduro World Series season. Rising to popularity due to embracing an all-mountain riding style, enduro racing requires equipment light enough for the ups but tough enough for the downs—a stark contrast to the extreme specialized setups of cross-country or downhill specific bikes and equipment. Here, Nico puts SRAM‘s new mountain wheels through the ringer in Peillon, France, as he gets them dialed for enduro in this, “The Relentless Pursuit of Balance.”

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SRAM XX1 SWEEPSTAKES | Winner announced

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Congratulations to Tim Kemmerer, winner of our SRAM XX1 Sweepstakes.

Tim wins a complete SRAM XX1 drivetrain with Gripshift valued at over $1,200.

Stay tuned for your chance to win more #bikeswag from Price Point.

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ENTER TO WIN | Free SRAM XX1 complete drivetrain

FREE: SRAM XX1

To celebrate the all-new Price Point, we are giving away a complete SRAM XX1 Gripshift drivetrain (32t, 175mm) valued at over $1,200 to one lucky rider.

 ENTER TO WIN

No purchase necessary. Full rules and regulations at PricePoint.com.

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AND THEN THERE WAS ONE | SRAM’s XX1 simplifies drivetrain performance

"Push, fellars! There's singletrack in dem der hills!"

Before gears, there was only one way to the top. Photo by Gary Fisher, courtesy of Charlie Kelly/Sonic.net

Gravity junkies and freeride fiends have been espousing the benefits of running single-ring setups nearly as long as they’ve been using shuttles and ski lifts in order to maximize their down time.

But why lose gears? At one point in the ‘70s—when a few boys in Nor Cal riding 1940s Schwinns figured out that grafting road gears onto their “klunkerz” allowed them to climb up as well as ride down—being able to shift was the single greatest innovation in the blossoming sport of mountain biking. We’ve been adding gears and complicating things ever since. More is better, right?

In theory, yes, but if you weren’t much concerned with climbing, it made sense to ditch the front rings—it was simpler, and, with the addition of a chainguide, all but eliminated dropped chains and the cacophony of chain slap.

So many a ham-fisted freerider went to work—not unlike those Nor Cal incendiaries years before—mixing and matching parts. They paired a single front ring with a rear cassette, then slapped some sort of chain-chastity containment unit around it. Which was fine, considering the extent of climbing on their “big” bikes was rather limited.

But what if you do climb and want a wide range of gears for a wide range of trails? And what if you climb mostly to reach the same kind of rowdy, chunky downhills capable of rattling the fillings out of your head, and don’t want to add guides and pulleys and gizmos just to avoid dropping your chain? We were trying to simplify things, weren’t we?

Enter XX1

SRAM’s XX1 goes up to 11. If they rode bikes, Spinal Tap would be stoked.

 

SRAM’s new golden child pairs a single, front chainring—available in 28, 30, 32, 34, 36 and 38-tooth flavors—with an 11-speed rear cassette for a wide range of gearing conducive to today’s all-mountain and enduro riders. But that’s not to pigeonhole it; everyone from cross-country hammerheads to aforementioned gravity junkies can find something to like here, especially with the wide range of rings available—rings designed not to drop chains. Seems like common sense.

Traditional rings are designed to drop chains, and traditional chain management then is designed to attempt to negate another component’s intended purpose. It all sounds a bit convoluted, doesn’t it?

In addition to lacking the ramping of traditional rings meant to dump the chain, XX1 ring features teeth of alternating thickness designed to fill the different size openings in the chain. SRAM calls it “X-Sync.” As it will be doing all the work all the time, SRAM made the front ring of durable aluminum, and paired it with carbon crank arms for a light-yet-strong package.

The X-Sync tooth design is designed not to drop chains. Who'd have thunk it?

The X-Sync teeth are designed not to drop chains. Who’d have thunk it?

 

Even the chain gets some special treatment here. Aside from playing nicely with the aforementioned X-Sync design of the front ring, the XX1 chain is coated with HARD CHROME—a friction-reducing coating to prevent wear, elongation and weakening. We see no reason this technology shouldn’t trickle down to other chains (it probably will), but it particularly makes sense here, where a thinner profile is necessary to mate with the tighter spacing of the 11-ring cluster.

Along with the Type 2 chain-tensioning clutch-style tech on the rear mech, all this means dropped chains essentially don’t exist. Sure, some riders may still opt for a guide of some sort, but most will likely never miss it should they ditch it. It also makes for a quiet ride—a really quiet ride. And anything that allows for greater appreciation of the sweet sounding duet that can only be performed by tires and dirt is fine by us.

Aside from the Type 2 technology, the XX1 rear derailleur moves in a “straight parallelogram” as opposed to the traditional “slant parallelogram” of traditional modern derailleurs. All this mumbo jumbo really means is that the shifting path moves perpendicular to the chain line, since the rear derailleur is now dedicated to rear shifts—not attempting to compensate for changes in chain length due to front shifts. Again, simple. Nice.

Shifting duties will be handled courtesy of an 11-speed shifter available as a trigger or the recently revived Grip Shift.

You rang?

While we can only guess what the next addition or subtraction might be to mountain-bike technology, SRAM’s XX1 seems like a simple-yet-elegant solution from which most riders—regardless of bike or riding style—can benefit.

Have you ridden XX1? Give us your impressions in the comments below.

Want to ride XX1? We’re giving away a complete XX1 drivetrain here.

The only real question now, is what will you do with all that newly vacant real estate on the other side of the bars? Maybe it’s time for a bell.

by Don Stefanovich 

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